Seven social ventures to support in Mexico City

29 July, 2020

1. Apolo beer

According to data from the Animal Defense Organization, about 500,000 dogs and cats are abandoned each year in Mexico. Apolo is the only craft beer that supports animal shelters to finance the rehabilitation and rescue of puppies. Furthermore, part of their job is to spread adoption campaigns and dignify the crossbreed dogs. Their message is simple: don’t buy purebred dogs, adopt one without a home.

Apolo currently works with independent brewers in Mexico City and sells 4 styles of beer: Black IPA, IPA, Pale Ale, and Lager. Plus, they have special kits that include glasses and t-shirts of the brand. The perfect gift for any dog lover!

How to support them?

Buy their beer and merch on their online store and through their social media pages: Instagram and Facebook. Ask for an Apolo beer at these bars in Mexico City, Taxco, and Aguascalientes.

Apolo beer shops
Image by @cerveza.apolo

2. Tiendita del Campo

  “Don’t forget that there’s a countryside within the city”. That’s the advice given by La Tiendita del Campo to encourage all of us to buy the handicrafts produced in the rural areas of Mexico City. This project, led by women from Xochimilco, helps small producers in Milpa Alta, Tláhuac, Xochimilco, and the State of Mexico to bring artisanal and chemical-free products to your doorstep.

The difference between it and other organic stores is this: La Tiendita del Campo is not a reseller, they work under a collaboration scheme and make direct alliances with producers.

How to support them?

Shop at La Tiendita del Campo in Coyoacán or place a delivery order here. Follow them on Instagram and Facebook.

Founder of La Tiendita del Campo
Georgina Ramírez, founder. Photo by @tienditadelcampomx

3. Las Panas

Las Panas support women who suffer from different types of violence through professional accompaniment, a supportive network, and economic empowerment. The founder, Rosalía Trujano, is a feminist and a psychologist. She and other professionals design the Bread Workshops.

These workshops, consist in four to six sessions where women from different parts of the city congregate in the kitchen and learn how to make different kinds of bread. Above all, they share their experiences and knowledge with other women.

At the end of the class, the participants can take the bread home or sell it, if their aim is to start their own business.

How to support them?

Share their content or attend some of their workshops. Every time you pay for a bread workshop, you are helping low-income woman to take it for free. Registrations and more information via Instagram and Facebook.

Las Panas Bread Workshop
Photo by @laspanasmx

4. Axolotitlán

The axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), is an endangered salamander endemic to the Xochimilco lake area. It’s considered a unique creature since it has the ability to regenerate its limbs and even organs such as the brain and heart.

Axolotitlán was born with the aim of promoting the axoltl research and conservation. Most importantly, to protect its natural habitat, which is disappearing due to the urbanization of the Xochimilco lakes. To fund their work they design and sell products, give educational courses, and bio-cultural tours.

Axolotitlán will soon open the first Ajolote Museum in Mexico City. Stay tuned!

How to support them?

Shop their products online or book a biocultural tour to learn more about the axolotl, via Instagram or Facebook.

Black Axolotes
Photo by @axolotitlan

5. Pixza

Without a doubt, this is one of our favorite social ventures and a clear example of Mexican creativity. “Pixza is a platform for social empowerment disguised as a pizzeria”.

Its founder, Alejandro Souza, had the brilliant idea of creating a pizza dough using blue corn. The toppings are Mexican stews, such as esquites, cochinita, and mole. However, beyond this culinary innovation, his true work is to support young people in impoverished situations. Pixza empower them through a multidisciplinary program at its restaurants.

How to support them?

Visit one of its four branches in Mexico City and become an “agent of change”. For every 5 pixzas sold, one pixza is given to a homeless person. Follow Pixza on Instagram and Facebook.

Pixza's workers
Photo by @pixza.mx

6. Lady Meche

La Merced neighborhood is as well known for its markets as for the services offered by hundreds of women on its streets. Some of these sex workers are victims of trafficking and others do so out of necessity.

Lady Meche was created by Paulina Flores, Helena García, Natalia Martínez, and Karina López to provide job opportunities to women trapped by the sex trade. Currently, they produce and market the Alba Malva natural cosmetic line, which includes balms, soaps, creams, and lotions, all made by women from La Merced neighborhood who are looking for a safe and violence-free work alternative.

How to support them?

Buy their cosmetics through their social media pages: Facebook and Instagram. Follow them to learn more about their project and La Merced.

Alba Malva lip balm
Photo by @lady_meche

7. Buna

Have you ever wondered where the coffee you drink comes from? Or how much they pay the farmers for each bag? At Buna, the “traceability” of coffee is a priority. Apart of roasting and distributing coffee, Buna visits different ecosystems of the country to learn about their biodiversity, soil type, and production chains.

Above all, they have made alliances with more than 300 producing families, from different parts of Mexico, to market honey, chocolate, and coffee. Ensuring a quality process for the harvest, fair agreements, and the conservation of ecosystems.

How to support them?

Buy a tasty coffee at their shop in Roma Norte or on its online store. Plus, they sell wholesale coffee to companies and business. Follow them on Facebook and Instagram.

Cup of coffee at Buna
Photo by @bunamx

Do you know any other social ventures in Mexico? We’d love to know more about them! Leave their names or sites in the comments below. 👇 🙂

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